A boy’s dream to beat osteosarcoma

He had forgotten what it was like to play sports at high school or go to a dance, even the thought of a walking down the hallways of his school like all his friends was taken away from him. The stealer of his teenage years was osteosarcoma. For two years he has spent more time in hospitals then at home battling cancer and all the treatments that went with it.

Surgeries after surgeries to cut out one lesion after another with great hopes each time he would go home. The doctors would tell him after each surgery there was chemotherapy that would follow, ‘just to be sure’. And on an occasion, he would receive radiation for good measure. He trusted his doctors and so too did his family; after all the doctors were trained specialists and they knew what they were doing. Right?

Wrong. The doctors knew his osteosarcoma was high-grade therefore fast growing, his recurrence was not a surprise to the doctors although one for the family. The doctors expected recurrence and expected he would not survive. Statistics show osteosarcoma patients have a poor prognosis and chemotherapy treatments do little to hold it back. Surgery is the most common method of dealing with osteosarcoma tumors and most children lose their limbs in a rapid band-aid approach to keeping kids alive as long as possible for the family. From this young teen boy’s point of view life without limbs was not something a child finds retaining their quality of life, in fact, he like most kids with osteosarcoma find themselves so sick life itself stops existing. Still kids fight because future life is all they see and want. Little do they know the word ‘future’ is not going to happen.

The family could stand watching him suffer no longer and began to seek answers. The doctors were not putting on their smiley optimistic faces with them any longer, they had grim faces as they told the family it was only a matter of time. Still some more chemo might get him to graduation which was only a few months off. But would he even be able to make graduation even if he survived that long?

He was stable, his nausea had subsided a bit and he wanted to go home, have his friends over, play music and laugh, which was something he had not done in a long time. His doctors said no. A new chemo drug was going to be tried. His family told the doctors their son did not want to have the new chemo and ruin his chances of going home even for a short time to have some fun. The doctors quickly turned angry and told the parents if they tried to remove him from the hospital a state order would be gotten to keep him there. His 18th birthday was only several months away, he would be 18 when he graduated; why could he make his own decision he plead. But the answer remained NO. He was still a child and they had control. The new chemo would begin.

The new treatment proved to be everything he feared and worse. His health deteriorated faster, he had trouble breathing and the put in a tube to breath. The nausea was overwhelming. Still they continued to pump him with the poisons and did not heed to his pleas to stop.

His parents and extended family began searching harder. They found Jesicha’s Hope and begged for help. Children are so vulnerable to whims of doctors using whatever treatment or drug they chose for whatever reason. The story as we listened was like so many other stories of children held in the grips of doctors when it was clear nothing conventional medicine could do would work. So why not let them go? Again, this is control to the fullest. No doctor wants to admit someone or something else they don’t have will work and make them look like failures. If they push and continue they look like heroes doing all that could be done.

Reality is doctors know from the onset there is nothing to help these kids survive and all their treatments will quickly take the quality of life away from these kids. Money and that ego of theirs gets in the way of doing right by kids.

As we discussed with the family the Philippine Protocol and how it could kill the cancer within their son they began to become hopeful and excited. But the dilemma was how to get him out of the hospital. They again pleaded with the doctors and still the answer was NO. How about just a weekend? The doctors agreed he could leave for the weekend but needed to return Sunday night for Monday treatments. The parents began to arrange a flight, it had to be a private flight due to his condition and that was going to cost thousands extra but still they knew this was the only way to get him out of the country fast.

That Friday arrived and the plane was on standby ready to take off within an hour of his release. By Monday he would be in the Philippines far from the chemo treatments. But late Friday afternoon the doctors came in to tell him they changed their minds. Just like that his dream was shattered. One specialist came to visit him and heard what had happened. He was part of the team of doctors but had not been apprised of his desire to stop treatment and go home. He understood and wanted to help.

We got a surprise call late in the evening from this specialist who told us he was at home and needed to discuss the plight of this young lad he had come to like. We explained the treatment and arranged that he call the Philippines for a private talk. He reviewed that data given him and was onboard. He told us he had read articles about the possibility of killing cancer using the science behind the Philippine Protocol but had no idea anyone in the world had actually made that breakthrough. Now his job was to help us get this boy to the Cebu Philippines.

Our friend now at the hospital talked to the doctors in charge and explained how the boy was not going to survive much longer and all he wanted was to go home so he could be with his family. He was met with resistance. Another conversation with the specialist revealed that the team had a feeling the parents wanted him to have some alterative treatments and felt they were going to spirit him away if they could get him out of the hospital based on some overheard conversation to that regard by nurses. Still he said the boy isn’t going to survive here so why not give him that chance if that is indeed what the parents wanted.

Another week had gone by and a Friday was approaching, the doctors suddenly said he could leave. The plane again was arranged and we all waited for Friday. A private ambulance picked him up at the hospital and the doctor gave the attending nurse for the ambulance a note regarding necessary care data for his flight. She opened it and the note said – the flight we know he will be taking is about 18 hours, the boy won’t last 12 hours, good luck.

But he made that 18-hour flight. And he was immediately taken to the local hospital that was awaiting his arrival. He was quickly assessed. There were specialists called in to review their new patient. Every doctor that attended him that day were appalled at the condition the boy was in. He had a bag hanging from him that was full of moldy blood, the bag had not been changed for a long time. He needed immediate transfusions. They removed the tubes to his lungs and found they were all moldy too, by Philippine standards and most everywhere you go the tubes should be changed daily, so how long were they in there to get black with mold? The parents and the boy claimed the tubes were never changed since they were put in three weeks prior. He was put on strong antibiotics immediately. Then the Philippine Protocol serums were given. He slowly looked better. And he began to feel like he was alive again. The treatment continued and within a week the hospital did scans to see how the serums had worked. The bones were clear, No more osteosarcoma.

The boy had achieved his dream, He beat osteosarcoma. All the tumors were dead, the large tumor on his arm disappeared. The one on his leg disappeared and the scans showed all other tumors were gone too. Finally, he was going to make it. Leaving this hospital was going to be a happy day because what he had imagined was going to become reality.

A couple of days before leaving the hospital he began having some confusion and was agitated, he heart was irregular. Specialists again began to evaluate him. They found black mold in his lungs and immediately did a pleural effusion using antibiotics as a flush. Since the amount of mold, he might have breathed in was unknown it was hard to tell what damage had occurred during the three period the mold tubes were in. Everyone waited. The procedure helped his lungs, but the heart was now highly irregular. Mycotoxins produced by black mold had caused inflammation of the heart known as myocarditis.

Suddenly he went into cardiac arrest, the resuscitated him, within minutes he went into cardiac arrest again, he was resuscitated again, this occurred once again, and he looked at the doctors and the scientist that cured his osteosarcoma told them thank you for making his dream come true but if his heart stopped again he was happy to remain on the other side. His heart stopped again a few minutes later.

If you or a loved one is suffering from osteosarcoma or any other cancer look into using the Philippine Protocol. Unlike other treatments this is a combination of breakthrough serums and 4th Generation PDT that kills cancer anywhere and everywhere in the body without the use of toxic chemicals or radiation, and surgery is not needed so children can have their arms and legs. If conventional has begun, the time is now to stop the poisoning of our children and give them the life they deserve. Hope is only a message, call or email a way.

Visit us at www.jesichashope.org – or our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/jesichashope, join our group: www.facebook.com/groups/alternativecancertreatments or contact us directly: info@jesichashope.org

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